TP-Link Archer D9 (AC1900) Wireless Dual Band Gigabit ADSL2+ Modem Router Review

TP-Link Archer D9

Hot on the heels of the Archer D7, TP-Link have released the Archer D9, a completely redesigned unit retaining similar features of the D7.

 Archer D9Archer D7
External Ports1 x Gigabit WAN/LAN Port
3 x Gigabit LAN Ports
1 x RJ11 Port
1 x USB 3.0 Port / 1 x USB 2.0 Port
1 x Gigabit WAN/LAN Port
3 x Gigabit LAN Ports
1 x RJ11 Port
2 x USB 2.0 Ports
Buttons1 x Power On/Off
1 x Wi-Fi On/Off
1 x WPS
1 x RESET
1 x Power On/Off
1 x Wi-Fi On/Off
1 x WPS
1 x RESET
ADSL StandardsADSL:
Full-rate ANSI T1.413 Issue 2
ITU-T G.992.1(G.DMT), ITU-T G.992.2(G.Lite)
ITU-T G.994.1 (G.hs), ITU-T G.995.1

ADSL2:
ITU-T G.992.3 (G.DMT.bis)
ITU-T G.992.4 (G.lite.bis)

ADSL2+:
ITU-T G.992.5
ADSL:
Full-rate ANSI T1.413 Issue 2
ITU-T G.992.1(G.DMT), ITU-T G.992.2(G.Lite)
ITU-T G.994.1 (G.hs), ITU-T G.995.1

ADSL2:
ITU-T G.992.3 (G.DMT.bis)
ITU-T G.992.4 (G.lite.bis)

ADSL2+:
ITU-T G.992.5
Wireless StandardsIEEE 802.11ac/n/a for 5GHz
IEEE 802.11n/g/b for 2.4GHz
IEEE 802.11ac/n/a for 5GHz
IEEE 802.11n/g/b for 2.4GHz
Wireless SpeedsUp to 1300Mbps @ 5GHz
Up to 600Mbps @ 2.4GHz
Up to 1300Mbps @ 5GHz
Up to 450Mbps @ 2.4GHz
Antenna3 × 2dBi for 2.4GHz and 3 × 3dBi for 5GHz3 x 2dBi for 2.4GHz and 3dBi for 5GHz
DHCPServer, Client, DHCP Client List,Address Reservation, DHCP relayServer, Client, DHCP Client List,Address Reservation, DHCP relay
QoSATM QoS, Traffic Control(IP QoS)ATM QoS, Traffic Control(IP QoS)
Port ForwardingVirtual server, Port Triggering, DMZ, ALG, UPnPVirtual server, Port Triggering, DMZ, ALG, UPnP
Dynamic DNSDynDns, NO-IPDynDns, NO-IP
Dimensions221mm (L) x 86mm (W) x 168.5mm (H)229mm (L) x 160mm (W) x 37mm (H)

Apart from the new design, some of the notable differences to the D7 are as follows:

  • Use of the Broadcom AC1900 wireless platform – support up to 600Mbps on 2.4Ghz
  • Support for Beamforming – boost wireless signal where required
  • Support for USB 3.0
  • Concurrent dual-band supporting a max of 1.9Gbps bandwidth

Unboxing

TP-Link Archer D9 Box

TP-Link Archer D9 Box

Front of the Archer D9

Front of the Archer D9

USB and Reset on the D9

USB and Reset on the D9

Back of the Archer D9

Back of the Archer D9

Status LEDs

Status LEDs

Configuration

The configuration screens on the D9 are identical to the ones we wrote about in the D7.

Login Screen

Login Screen

Status Screen

Status Screen

ADSL2+ Performance

From what I can gather, the D9 uses the BCM6301 ADSL2+Line Driver with a BCM6318 ADSL2+ Bridge/Router for the processing. According to Broadcom:

“The primary BCM6318 processing engine is a 333 MHz MIPS32®, with a 64 KB four-way I-cache and a 32 KB D-cache. Additionally, the BCM6318 integrates a Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) switch with four integrated EEE 10/100 Ethernet ports and one RGMII interface. A USB 2.0 host/device port is also available for connectivity to USB peripherals.” – source

As expected, the max sync speed on the D9 was almost identical to what we saw on the D7. That said, the actual downstream sync achieved was lower with the D9 than the D7 which was interesting considering both use the same combination of Broadcom chips.

Archer D7 DSL Connection

Archer D7 DSL Connection

Archer D9 DSL Connection

Archer D9 DSL Connection

Wireless Performance

TP-Link continue with their use of Broadcom chips with the inclusion of the BCM4360 which supports the “3-stream 802.11ac specification” to deliver up to 1.3Gbps on 5Ghz and Beamforming technology to deliver signal boost where needed. Wireless performance was consistent with what we saw with the D7 and the D9 performed slightly better on 2.4Ghz. The different channels being used on 5Ghz could be attributed to the performance difference between the 2 routers. In any case, our portable devices (iPhone 5S, Nexus 7 and Surface Pro 2) had no problems connecting to the Archer D9 from several locations.

Wireless Performance

Wireless Performance

Further benchmarking will be performed once we get our hands on a compatible AC1900 client adapter.

Final Thoughts

It’s great to see another router utilising the AC1900 platform. TP-Link continue to refine and improve their product designs with each model being more ergonomic and elegant than its predecessor. The Archer D9 is a another great all-rounder from TP-Link with almost everything (still lacks VoIP) you need available straight out of the box.

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 thoughts on “TP-Link Archer D9 (AC1900) Wireless Dual Band Gigabit ADSL2+ Modem Router Review”

  1. I just purchased an Archer D9 modem+router unit and absolutely love this product. The performance and overall coverage wireless AC transmission total combined 1900Ghz is impressive. The unit features plenty of configuration options and has improved my DSL internet connection considering that AT&T is my provider and I only get 6megs for speed. But when using network shared storage (via USB connected portable hard drive) transferring a large 2gig video file takes 1 to 2 minutes. It’s VERY fast. Surfing on the web, watching videos, streaming (keep in mind I’m on 6meg DSL) everything is much faster. However I hate the color white and I prefer the unit sitting flat on a surface instead of being mounted on a stand. Kind of ugly to be honest.

    The issues that plague it are :

    1. When using it as a file server to share my USB hard disk, when sharing the entire disk, the D9 cannot read the file types which are AVI, MPG, and MP4 video. when trying to view or play the videos via DNLA by my TV, for whatever reason, the D9 displays all of the hard disk folders in a weird, out of order arrangement. The D9 can see the folders it displays, but not the files in them. Instead it displays “NO MEDIA FILES”. TP Link states that the maximum limit of USB storage size is 2 terabytes. However, I have a 4 terabyte hard disk connected and the unit can see and write to it. A previous update allowed two 4 TB USB hard drives to be seen by the D9 but unfortunately only one was able to be accessed.

    2. The second problem is I’m on a 6-meg speed DSL connection via AT&T. When I log into the modem + router web based control panel, it displays my connection’s speed, however when I connect my computer via ethernet cable to the unit, I get a maximum of 4.8 meg DSL speed. I tested this again with an older DSL modem and I get the true full speed of 6 megs.

    3. Automatic QoS (Quality of Service) is not present at all. When I’m streaming TV and downloading something on my mobile device such as my tablet for example, the video on the TV gets choppy or cuts off momentarily. And when I’m transferring data between my computer to a portable USB storage connected to the D9, sometimes the unit crashes where I have to power cycle/reboot it again to restore normal function.

    And presently with the latest firmware # Archer D9_V1_150514 released on 5/25/2015 some bugs and security holes were corrected as well as USB transfer speeds were greatly improved, however the issues listed here STILL exist.

  2. After reading your review and checking out some others, I bought one of these to replace my Netgear R6300 but for the life of me I can’t get it to work, I can’t even get to the 198.162.1.1 site nor the tplinkmodem.net site to actually set it up.

    I tried using the disc the came with it but it wants me to plug in an adsl line, but I have fibre cable internet.

    Did you get the same issue when setting up? I can’t figure out where I went wrong. I am able to connect to its wireless but can’t load anything, but the LAN connection doesn’t even pick up. I can’t tell if I have a dud or if I am doing something wrong.

    So far, all I did was plug it in.

    I have a CISCO DPQ3925 that Optus gave me, (i actually wanted to replaced this and thought the TPLink was a cable modem as well, I obviously misread things), I connected the TPLINK to the cisco via it’s WAN connection, but I get nothing out of it. Is this incorrect? Is the TPLINK only for ADSL connection?

    Oddly enough, If i plug in my Netgear to the TPLINK the internet picks back up.

    1. OK, firstly, you’ve bought the ADSL2+ modem router and you have fibre installed. You only needed the TP-Link wireless access point (without the ADSL modem). Secondly, there is a good chance that your fibre modem is also running DHCP and using a different subnet as the TP-Link. That’s a possible reason as to why you can’t access the TP-Link modem. If the netgear works it’s most likely on the same subnet as the TP-Link.

      You can either, configure the TP-Link to work off the same subnet as the CISCO or configure the CISCO to work off the same subnet as the TP-Link. Do you know the IP range the CISCO is using?

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